Chicken with shallots

Another from originally from the New York Times. This starts with bone-in chicken thighs (and let’s face it, if you are cooking chicken then bone-in is the only way to get something lovely) and uses a traditional white wine, shallot, and tarragon.

I’ve modified the original (in italics) where I thought it made more sense.

Chicken shallots, mid-cooking

Ingredients

  • 8 bone-in chicken thighs
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 12 to 15 whole medium shallots, peeled
  • 2 cups white wine
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 2 sprigs tarragon
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, cut in half.

Directions

  1. Rinse chicken thighs in water, and pat them very dry with paper towels. Sprinkle over them the flour, salt and pepper. (they don’t need to be bone dry, don’t obsess about this part)
  2. Melt the butter in a large, heavy-bottomed pot or skillet set over medium-high heat. When the butter foams, cook the chicken, in batches if necessary, until well browned and crisp on all sides. Set aside.
  3. Add the whole shallots (some shallots are too big, I chopped those in half) to the pot and sauté them in the butter and chicken fat until they begin to soften and caramelize, approximately 10 to 12 minutes. Add the wine to deglaze the pot, stir with a large spoon, then add the mustard and tarragon, then the chicken thighs. Cover the pot, turn the heat to low and simmer for 30 minutes.  Put the chicken into the oven, uncovered, until the meat is done.
  4. Remove the lid, and allow the sauce to reduce and thicken, 15 to 20 minutes.
  5. Add the cherry tomatoes to the pot, stir lightly to combine and serve immediately.

Ginger Garlic Scallion Crusted Chicken! (GGSCC = TGIF)

http://wp.me/p1vRhv-d9 We don’t eat a lot of chicken as the meat itself isn’t very flavorful.
This looks like it could dress it up a little.

I should note that chicken *can* taste great but you need to find a
really natural bird and roast the whole thing. We’ve found that
chickens in the US tend to be way heavier in the breast and lighter in
the legs than the European ones. And they just don’t have a ton of
flavor. Maybe if we find some free-range birds for sale we’ll try
again.

Ginger Garlic Scallion Crusted Chicken! (GGSCC = TGIF)

http://wp.me/p1vRhv-d9 We don’t eat a lot of chicken as the meat itself isn’t very flavorful.
This looks like it could dress it up a little.

I should note that chicken *can* taste great but you need to find a
really natural bird and roast the whole thing. We’ve found that
chickens in the US tend to be way heavier in the breast and lighter in
the legs than the European ones. And they just don’t have a ton of
flavor. Maybe if we find some free-range birds for sale we’ll try
again.


Dinner Sunday. Chicken leg (much bigger here than in France) with spice rub and cooked in olive oil. Spinach sautéed with a little red onion.

Crispy nut and herb fried chicken

This recipe is adapted from Mark’s Daily Apple, a site dedicated to “primal” diet and health. I admit I am intrigued by “primal” or “paleo” even though I am healthily skeptical of some of the claims.

Ingredients

  • Chopped almonds. The original recipe calls for chopping nuts in a food processor. I don’t have one here so I bought finely chopped almonds.
  • 4 chicken breasts
  • 2 Eggs
  • Olive oil
  • Herbs, in my case herbes de provence and some ginger

Directions

The chicken should be rinsed and then patted dry with a paper towel. Add olive oil to the skillet and bring to a medium heat (hot enough that water droplets will crackle when sprinkled). I use enough to cover the pan to a depth of 1cm.

Crack two eggs into a bowl, whisk. On a plate mix the chopped almonds and herbs and spread the mix out. Dip the chicken breasts into the egg wash, then “bread” them in the almond/herb mixture.

Make sure the oil is hot enough to fry. If it’s too cool then the chicken will be soggy and greasy. Fry the chicken until golden brown and the inside is done (I go for~150F as the chicken will cook a little more when it’s removed from the oil. I think the guidelines are higher but I don’t worry as much if I buy quality chicken). Put the chicken on a plate with paper towels to absorb any extra oil.

In our case we served it with leak-vinaigrette terrine. Beautiful meal. The only improvement next time is getting more coarsely-ground almonds to make the chicken crunchier.